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The Missouri House of Representatives advanced one of the nations strongest pro-life bills in an afternoon of debate, leading to what could be a ban of almost all abortions in the state.

Missouri House legislators passed House Bill 126, the “Heartbeat Bill,” that would make abortions illegal in the cases of a detected heartbeat, cases in which a baby has reached the age it can feel pain, and in selective abortion cases of sex, race or down-syndrome diagnosis. In addition, the legislation would require that both parents are notified before an abortion takes place.

The bill advanced with a 117 to 39 full house vote Feb. 27, and will head to the Missouri Senate where it will undergo committees and suggested amendments, according to the Missouri Legislature. If it passes the Senate, it would go to the governor's desk for signature approval or rejection.

Rep. Sonya Anderson, R-Mo., spoke in favor of the bill during debate.

“I am proud that Missouri, the Show-Me State is showing the rest of the country that we will stick up for the unborn,” Anderson said on the House floor.

Those in opposition of the bill said it limits a woman's ability to choose under Roe v. Wade and that not having language in the bill directed toward cases of rape, incest or similar situations is dangerous.

Rep. Cora Walker, D-Mo., said she is terrified of the bill.

“There’s been no combination of such draconian laws and measures,” Walker said in an interview with KSDK, NBC affiliate of St. Louis.

Lawmakers across the country are proposing similar legislation limiting abortion. Many states are willing to uphold state laws regarding abortion that would be carried out in spite of the 1973 Roe v. Wade federal ruling establishing a national right to abortion.

States proposing anti-abortion legislation are including what is referred to as the “trigger ban,” which is defined as exceptions for abortion only in the case of medical emergencies.

Trigger bans would go into effect if the bill passes in that state and if the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade, according to The Kansas City Star.

Those with similar “trigger” bans on record are Louisiana, Mississippi, North Dakota and South Dakota. Efforts to pass similar bills are present in Florida, Kentucky, Ohio, South Carolina and Tennessee.

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson said in a statement that he agrees with Missouri’s proposed legislation so far.

“I applaud the bipartisan efforts of the Missouri House of Representatives for choosing to take a bold stand to protect women's health and the right to life,” Parson said.

The heartbeat bill makes an abortion taking place in violation of the bill provisions a class B felony.

It requires a physician to first look for a heartbeat of the unborn before going through with an abortion. If a fetal heartbeat is noticed, the physician can not undergo or induce an abortion.

If there is no heartbeat detected, an abortion can take place but must be done within 96 hours of the fetal heartbeat test.

Physicians that do not perform a heartbeat test prior to inducing an abortion could have their medical license rejected, suspended or revoked and could have to pay up to a $1,000 fine.

Any physician who performs an abortion after a fetal heartbeat is found would have their license revoked and any future license applications denied under bill provisions.

Rep. Crystal Quade, D-Mo., shared a personal story on the house floor about being sexually abused by her father as a child, according to the Kansas City Star. She said provisions discussed would not have helped her if she became pregnant.

“I see nowhere in your bill for people like me,” Quade said. “Gentlemen, what would I have done?”

Since the bill does not have exceptions for rape or incest, there is an estimated potential $7.7 million loss of funding for the state from federal Medicaid. This is due to it appearing to conflict with Medicaid regulations regarding abortion, according to The Chicago Tribune.

Some lawmakers take the potential loss of funding more seriously than others, as other states that have passed similar laws have not been cut off from Medicaid.

Rep. Nick Schroer, R-Mo., said the bill was formed with precision and care for Missourians as one of the most strict pro-life proposals in the country.

“It’s the most sound, comprehensive, pro-life bill in the entire U.S.,” Schroer said in an interview with KSDK of St. Louis.

Prior to the proposed bill, Missouri already has some of the most restrictive laws on abortions in the country. There is a 72-hour wait for women who want to get one, and there was a decline of about 4,513 abortions between 2008 and 2018, in part due to accessibility, according to data from the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services.

First district Rep. Allen Andrews R-Mo., said abortion is the most sensitive topic discussed on the house floor.

“We have to keep in mind the women who are going through these situations,” Andrews said. “Who are we if we leave them to fend on their own when they do choose life for their child?”

Andrews added that the bill is about more than just abortion.

“We are talking about how we value human life and take care of people” Andrews said. “Every human life is worth the same.”

The Missouri heartbeat bill passed the house with some bipartisan support and is facing another round of discussion and amendments in the Senate.

The Missouri House of Representatives advanced one of the nations strongest pro-life bills in an afternoon of debate, leading to what could be a ban of almost all abortions in the state.

Missouri House legislators passed House Bill 126, the “Heartbeat Bill,” that would make abortions illegal in the cases of a detected heartbeat, cases in which a baby has reached the age it can feel pain, and in selective abortion cases of sex, race or down-syndrome diagnosis. In addition, the legislation would require that both parents are notified before an abortion takes place.

The bill advanced with a 117 to 39 full house vote Feb. 27, and will head to the Missouri Senate where it will undergo committees and suggested amendments, according to the Missouri Legislature. If it passes the Senate, it would go to the governor's desk for signature approval or rejection.

Rep. Sonya Anderson, R-Mo., spoke in favor of the bill during debate.

“I am proud that Missouri, the Show-Me State is showing the rest of the country that we will stick up for the unborn,” Anderson said on the House floor.

Those in opposition of the bill said it limits a woman's ability to choose under Roe v. Wade and that not having language in the bill directed toward cases of rape, incest or similar situations is dangerous.

Rep. Cora Walker, D-Mo., said she is terrified of the bill.

“There’s been no combination of such draconian laws and measures,” Walker said in an interview with KSDK, NBC affiliate of St. Louis.

Lawmakers across the country are proposing similar legislation limiting abortion. Many states are willing to uphold state laws regarding abortion that would be carried out in spite of the 1973 Roe v. Wade federal ruling establishing a national right to abortion.

States proposing anti-abortion legislation are including what is referred to as the “trigger ban,” which is defined as exceptions for abortion only in the case of medical emergencies.

According to The Kansas City Star, trigger bans would go into effect if the bill passes in that state and if the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade. 

Those with similar “trigger” bans on record are Louisiana, Mississippi, North Dakota and South Dakota. Efforts to pass similar bills are present in Florida, Kentucky, Ohio, South Carolina and Tennessee.

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson said in a statement that he agrees with Missouri’s proposed legislation so far.

“I applaud the bipartisan efforts of the Missouri House of Representatives for choosing to take a bold stand to protect women's health and the right to life,” Parson said.

The heartbeat bill makes an abortion taking place in violation of the bill provisions a class B felony.

It requires a physician to first look for a heartbeat of the unborn before going through with an abortion. If a fetal heartbeat is noticed, the physician can not undergo or induce an abortion.

If there is no heartbeat detected, an abortion can take place but must be done within 96 hours of the fetal heartbeat test.

Physicians that do not perform a heartbeat test prior to inducing an abortion could have their medical license rejected, suspended or revoked and could have to pay up to a $1,000 fine.

Any physician who performs an abortion after a fetal heartbeat is found would have their license revoked and any future license applications denied under bill provisions.

Rep. Crystal Quade, D-Mo., shared a personal story on the house floor about being sexually abused by her father as a child, according to the Kansas City Star. She said provisions discussed would not have helped her if she became pregnant.

“I see nowhere in your bill for people like me,” Quade said. “Gentlemen, what would I have done?”

Since the bill does not have exceptions for rape or incest, there is an estimated potential $7.7 million loss of funding for the state from federal Medicaid. This is due to it appearing to conflict with Medicaid regulations regarding abortion, according to The Chicago Tribune.

Some lawmakers take the potential loss of funding more seriously than others, as other states that have passed similar laws have not been cut off from Medicaid.

Rep. Nick Schroer, R-Mo., said the bill was formed with precision and care for Missourians as one of the most strict pro-life proposals in the country.

“It’s the most sound, comprehensive, pro-life bill in the entire U.S.,” Schroer said in an interview with KSDK of St. Louis.

Prior to the proposed bill, Missouri already has some of the most restrictive laws on abortions in the country. There is a 72-hour wait for women who want to get one, and there was a decline of about 4,513 abortions between 2008 and 2018, in part due to accessibility, according to data from the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services.

The Missouri heartbeat bill passed the house with some bipartisan support and is facing another round of discussion and amendments in the Senate.

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