Features logo

Students don’t only want more bins, students need more bins for efficiency and a better experience for those moving in.

The handy yellow moving bins located around Northwest living quarters and departments are the unsung necessity of Northwest, yet, there are not nearly enough of them to go around when move in day comes.

For most students, they have been through move in as freshmen. Even with staggered dates for when residents can set up their dorms, the problem still remains. The amount of items a student brings does not equal the amount of yellow bins available at the rate people move in.

A lot of students bring many items for their daily lives while at school. This includes mini fridges, microwaves, boxes of clothes, gaming consoles, TVs and even some home decor. Most of these weigh enough that it takes two or three people to transport it, not to mention some are awkward to carry in the first place.

Not only do the yellow bins reduce the number of trips taken from car to dorm, it also helps the backs of friends and family members.

They really save time for everybody.

Whenever there is bad weather, which Maryville is often prone to have especially on move in days, the bins are lifesavers. Even though they won’t protect against the rain or wind, by allowing faster transportation, many people have avoided the better part of the storm.

So many times, there have been people carrying in a load of items simply because there was no bin they could use. This shouldn’t happen, especially when these bins could do the work easily.

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.