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Paramore release comeback single

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Posted: Wednesday, January 23, 2013 9:02 am | Updated: 9:34 pm, Wed Jan 23, 2013.

“There’s a time and a place to die, but this ain’t it,” words belted by Paramore singer Hayley Williams during the band’s brand new single, “Now.” “Now” is the band’s first album release since parting ways with drummer Josh Farro and guitarist Zac Farro in late 2010.  

A tremendous amount of speculation circled the band after the departure of the Farro brothers, including whether or not the band could deliver on the stage or in the studio without the core of its outfit-and with the release of “Now,” it appears they most certainly can.  “Now” is a track that shows diversity and progression from a group best known for producing pop-rock anthems.  

This particular track has more of an edge to it, while still containing one of the best hooks delivered from a rock band in the last few years (coming only second to Grammy-nominated fun. with the monster single “We Are Young). The entire song shows an underlying theme, lyrically, that can be directly related to the band’s absence from the scene.  Williams spouts in the first verse, “It feels like I’m waken from the dead and everyone’s been waiting on me.  At least I’ll never have to wonder what it’s like to sleep a year away.”  She continues this message in the pre-chorus with lines such as, “Bringing my sinking ship back to the shore.” 

Many critics point a shaking finger at Paramore, comparing them to female-led juggernaut No Doubt; however, “Now” shows that the bands have many differences musically.  “Now” is far more aggressive then any track No Doubt would release in a top 40 market, and Williams shows off a greater presence of lyrical and vocal creativity then Gwen Stefani has in her entire career.  If one must compare Paramore’s latest release to any other female-fronted rock band, he should look toward the Yeah Yeah Yeah’s, if anything at all.  Overall, it is a unique and career-changing track that sets the stage high for April’s self-titled release.  Check back in the April 21 edition of The Missourian for a review on the full record.  

 

 

Rating: 5/5 

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